If the Legends Are True ... A work in progress

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Matches 601 to 625 of 902     » Thumbnails Only    » Slide Show

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601
Millsaps → Reuben Webster residence
Millsaps → Reuben Webster residence
 
 
602
Mims → Betty Nell
Mims → Betty Nell
 
 
603
Mims → James
Mims → James
 
 
604
Mims → Eula & Children
Mims → Eula & Children
Right to left: Mary, Bobbye, Charles, Eula, Betty, Ruby 
 
605
Mitchell → Lavie M.
Mitchell → Lavie M.
 
 
606
Montagu House, Westminster
Montagu House, Westminster
In 1731, John Montagu, 2nd Duke of Montagu, abandoned the existing grand Montagu House in the socially declining district of Bloomsbury, which was later to become the premises of the British Museum, and purchased a site that had once been occupied by the Archbishops of York's London residence and had later been part of the site of Whitehall Palace. He built himself a relatively modest mansion in the conventional style of the day, which can be seen in Canaletto's painting of Whitehall.

In the late 1850s, the 2nd Duke of Montagu's descendant, Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 5th Duke of Buccleuch, one of the United Kingdom's three or four richest landowners, replaced the Georgian house with one of the grandest private mansions in London. 
 
607
Moore → Marion Joshua & Ada Eugenia Kinney
Moore → Marion Joshua & Ada Eugenia Kinney
Josh is holding Jewell, Belk is in the middle, and Mac is standing on the side. 
 
608
More → Barnburgh Hall
More → Barnburgh Hall
The first written evidence of the Cresacres occupying the Manor of Barnburgh is to be found in the Harlean manuscripts in which a document is preserved which gives a John Cresacre as Lord of Barnburgh in 1281. The last Cresacre of the male line was Edward who was born in 1485 and came into possession of the estate at the age of 16 in 1501 on the death of his father, John, who died on February 3rd of that year. At that time the estate was worth £100 per annum, which in those days was a considerable sum. Edward Cresacre married Jane, the daughter of Sir Richard Bassett, of Fletborough, Notts, and they had a daughter Annie who was born in 1510, becoming heiress to the estate in 1512 at the age of two years. The More family continued in possession of the Barnburgh property until circa 1820-1822 and the last to reside at the Hall was Thomas Peter More. The Hall was demolished by the British Coal Board in 1969. 
 
609
More → Cecily
More → Cecily
 
 
610
More → Cresacre
More → Cresacre
 
 
611
More → Elizabeth
More → Elizabeth
 
 
612
More → John
More → John
 
 
613
More → John
More → John
 
 
614
More → Margaret
More → Margaret
 
 
615
More → Thomas
More → Thomas
 
 
616
More → Thomas II
More → Thomas II
 
 
617
Morgan → George Goodloe
Morgan → George Goodloe
 
 
618
Morgan → Grady, Maggie & Timmy
Morgan → Grady, Maggie & Timmy
 
 
619
Morgan → Tim Junior and grandmother Maggie
Morgan → Tim Junior and grandmother Maggie
 
 
620
Morton → Joy - office
Morton → Joy - office
The Joy Morton & Co Building in Chicago was modeled after the old Boston "Town House" of Thomas Joy. 
 
621
Moss → Benjamin Rush with Family
Moss → Benjamin Rush with Family
First row: Florence Moss (1872-1920), wife of Hiram Stowers, Benjamin Rush Moss (1839-1922), father, Vinton R. Moss (1893-1966), Mary Louise Davis Moss (1848-1927), mother (daughter of William Patton Davis and Sarah Wynne Hall), Annie Maiden Moss Peery (1878-1916)
Back row: Lucie Moss Anderson, Sally Mae Moss (1874-1931), wife of Dr. J. H. Moore, Will Moss (married Virginia Sayers), Tillie Moss (1882-1906), Ben Rush Moss (1888-1962), Maude Moss Jones (1884-1967). Courtesy of Rose Brown Peery and J. M. Hoge. 
 
622
Moss → Charles R.
Moss → Charles R.
From Left: T. Ed Rosenbaum, Charles R. Moss, and George Rosenbaum, brother of Ed. 
 
623
Moss → Clint - sheep
Moss → Clint - sheep
Clint Moss and Dr. E. A. Holmes and registered (purebred) Hampshire yearling rams, Burke's Garden 
 
624
Moss → George & Frank
Moss → George & Frank
George and Frank Moss, twin brothers from Burke's Garden, had delivered cattle to a buyer in Baltimore. A pickpocket saw Frank put the money in his inside coat pocket, trailed him through the station, lost him temporarily, thought he found him again in a crowded streetcar, but it was really George. After a try or two to lift his wallet in the usual way without success, the pickpocket started cutting his coat with a sharp knife, still without success of course. When he cut through to the skin, George realized what was happening and grabbed the man, hollered to Frank for help, and turned the man over to a policeman. The brothers went on to the photographer for this picture. And this is the reason George is holding his arm so as to cover a bad flaw in an expensive suit of clothes. Frank Moss, in his youth, was the working partner of Major T.J. Higginbotham of Liberty, in buying cattle in southwest Virginia, driving them on foot to Pennsylvania and Maryland, fording the Potomac River above Washington, and loading them on cattleboats at Annapolis for England. This is the origin of the term "export cattle" for all cattle weighing over 1200 pounds.

Photograph by R. Holyland, Baltimore. Courtesy of J.M. Hoge and Nancy Moss Wollbrinck. 
 
625
Moss → George H.
Moss → George H.
 
 

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